Testimonials


-  "Received! I'm just speechless!  The fit and finish is insane! Whats most surprising was the weight and thick(er) spine.  MAnnnnnnnnn thank you! " 

Full Review & Video

L.C.  3/14/18


- "There aren’t many opportunities nowadays for a consumer to express his appreciation for and admiration of craftsmanship and technical skill directly to the artisan; the knife world is perhaps an anomaly in that regard.  As a cook I have at least some understanding of the unseen foundation of knowledge and practice and refinement that underlies and precedes the final presentation of a craftsman’s work. So I shall take this opportunity to share with you how impressed I am with the first example of your work that I recently purchased. Upon first using the O1 gyuto I felt the same sense of amazement as when I got my Mac after only having used German knives and as when I got my Gengetsu as my first handmade knife after some Japanese factory knives; yours is a similar step beyond anything I’ve personally experienced. The feeling was amplified after using it at work. I’m still a novice and a small-timer compared to many members on this forum but I’ve acquired a few dozen knives in the last year questing for something better and have now found it, such that I decided to buy the CPM154 one and make some of my others obsolete. Great stuff and much appreciated!"   -  Tom 3/14/18

 

-  "Remember the first time you used a Japanese knife?

For me it was a Shun Santoku. It was light, nimble, and oh so sharp. A game changer. Stumbling across the forums and finding there was much more to knifes then Global and Shun was another game changer. 

Over the years I've purchased knifes from a variety of makers, Sugimoto, Mizuno, Tadatsuna, Masamoto, Carter, Konosuke, Hattori, Suisin, Takeda. I've appreciated all of the knifes, but none of them gave me the experience of the Shun. 
There comes a point, when you realize that new knifes don't add much to the collection. The current knifes are just as capable as the new knife. Exploring different types of knifes such as honsuke, garasuki, and hankotsu is fun, but they are specialty knifes, not an every day chef knife. 

Seeing a picture of a nice knife always gets my attention. I wonder how would it cut? Probably not better then anything that I already have. Plus gyutos are not my preferred knife. I'm a cleaver guy. Gyutos all have that sleek and sharp look. Cleavers have all the appeal of a stick with a license plate attached to it, but they work for me. 

I have appreciated the pictures of Dave's gyutos for awhile now. Sometimes western makers interpretation of the gyuto can be odd. Dave's looks right to me. 

I don't know how many times I've been impressed by the picture of one of his knifes. I feel the itch to purchase, then think will it add anything to my collection? Gyutos are not my preferred knife, and then look at the price. They are normally well outside my price range. 

We all have different reasons for collecting. At the end of the day, my knifes are tools. My price range is set by my tolerance for loss. It is much easier to live with screwing up a $200 - $300 knife then a $1200 knife. 

Dave put up for sale the 250mm gyuto. Who doesn't like a knife with a red swirly handle? The price was a bit outside my price range. What got my attention besides the handle was the comment about this knife being close to Dave's ideal grind. I could only imagine the number of knifes that have come through Dave's shop to be sharpened. 

The price dropped on the knife and then again. It was in my price range. I was intrigued by the ideal grind comment, so I pulled the trigger. 

I had mixed emotions about the purchase. I was a bit surprised and concerned about the lack of enthusiasm for a Dave knife especially at this price. 

To put the knife through its paces I picked up some tomatoes, onions, potatoes and carrots. Tomatoes especially softer ones are a good challenge. I placed the front of the knife on the tomato and it sank in with no pressure. I've never had that happen. I left the sides of the tomato on the thick side. Very little to no resistance as the knife went through the skin. I've never had a knife as sharp as this one. 

I cut up an onion next and was amazed how thin I was able to get the slices. A cleaver with its size and weight is very good at slicing onions, better then any of the gyutos I've used until this one. I've been able to do a very fine dice with this knife much easier then any of my cleavers. 

I'm excited about the performance but what about the dreaded stiction or food sticking to the sides of the knife? I diced up some large russet potatoes. The knife went through most of the potatoes with hardly any sticking. The few potatoes that stuck fell right off with a light touch. Stiction not an issue. 

What seemed to deter some people from the knife was the poly handle. What would it be like wet? I rinsed the knife and handle. What little water stayed on the handle did not make it slick or cause it to slip. The knife stayed firmly in hand while I diced up an onion.

The Martell knife has been the closest thing to what I experienced when I picked up a Shun knife all those years ago. A game changer. It redefines what a high performance knife should be. 

How many threads over the years have been about, "If you can only have one knife?". I know I'm still in the honeymoon phase with the Martell knife, but it clearly out performs every other knife in my collection, including my cleavers. I never thought I'd see the day when a gyuto beat out my cleavers. In general I don't think gyutos are better knifes then cleavers, but this Martell kicks ass!"

Jay  3/19/18